sick - ill


sick - ill
Ill and sick are both used to say that someone has a disease or some other problem with their health.

Davis is ill.

...a sick child.

Your uncle is very sick.

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Most British speakers do not use ill in front of a noun unless they are also using an adverb. For example, they do not talk about `an ill woman', but they might talk about `a seriously ill woman'.

...a terminally ill patient.

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American and Scottish speakers sometimes use ill in front of a noun without using an adverb.

We had to get medical help for our ill sisters.

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You do not say that someone becomes `iller' or `more ill'. You say that they become worse.

Each day Kunta felt a little worse.

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'be sick'
To be sick means to bring up food from your stomach. See entry at ↑ sick.
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You do not use ill or sick to say that someone has received an injury. You say that they are injured or hurt. See entries at ↑ injure and ↑ hurt.
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Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • SICK — Unternehmensform Aktiengesellschaft ISIN (keine Börsennotierung) DE0007237208, (keine Börsennotierung) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sick — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Ann Sick (* 1958), US amerikanische Crosslauf Sommerbiathletin Bastian Sick (* 1965), deutscher Journalist und Autor Erwin Sick (1909–1988), deutscher Erfinder und Unternehmer Georg Sick (1861 ???),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • sick — [sɪk] adjective 1. a sick company, economy etc is one that has financial or other difficulties such as corruption (= dishonest, illegal, or immoral behaviour): • The President lost popularity when his reforms failed to revive a sick economy. • a… …   Financial and business terms

  • sick up — ˌsick ˈup [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they sick up he/she/it sicks up present participle sicking up past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • sick — ► ADJECTIVE 1) affected by physical or mental illness. 2) feeling nauseous and wanting to vomit. 3) informal disappointed, embarrassed, or miserable. 4) (sick of) bored by or annoyed with through excessive exposure. 5) informal having abnormal or …   English terms dictionary

  • Sick — Sick, v. i. To fall sick; to sicken. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sick|en — «SIHK uhn», intransitive verb. 1. to become sick: »to sicken with typhus. The bird sickened when kept in the cage. 2. a) to feel horror or nausea; experience revulsion (at something). b) to grow weary or tired (of a thing). c) to long eagerly. –v …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sick|le — «SIHK uhl», noun, verb, led, ling. –n. a tool with a short, curved blade on a short handle, used for cutting grass, reaping grain, and the like. –v.i. to take the shape of a sickle: »The tendency of red blood cells from such people to sickle can… …   Useful english dictionary

  • sick|le — «SIHK uhl», noun, verb, led, ling. –n. a tool with a short, curved blade on a short handle, used for cutting grass, reaping grain, and the like. –v.i. to take the shape of a sickle: »The tendency of red blood cells from such people to sickle can… …   Useful english dictionary

  • sick|ly — «SIHK lee», adjective, li|er, li|est, adverb, verb, lied, ly|ing. –adj. 1. often sick; not strong and healthy. SYNONYM(S): ailing, indispo …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sick — Sick, n. Sickness. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English